*The foreshore is the zone which is wet by the largest non-extraordinary waves.

*It should be noted that the law foresaw the demolition of existing enclosures blocking access to the coast – a radical measure by the standards of the time – as well as the removal of buildings on the shore and the transfer of the ownership of these buildings to the local authorities or to organizations for the public good until their demolition. However, while these provisions were considered reasonable by all parties and satisfied the ‘sense of public justice’, they have – with very few exceptions – not been applied, due to the familiar inertia and involvement of the governmental bodies and the corruption and clientelism of local politics. However, this does not rob the provisions of their importance even today, since all remain in force and can be activated at any time, demonstrating once again that Greece has a wellstocked and well-provisioned – though inactive, unused and sometimes undermined – spatial planning armoury.

*An official inventory of coastal zones for the Greek territory does not currently exist. Neither does a legal map indicating existing legal measures for the protection of each coast.

*That Greece has more coastline than any other European on Mediterranean country is a fundamental consideration in spatial planning as well is it environmental and development of policies. In fact Greece has over 3000 islands and islets which represent 20% of its surface area and 14% of its population. In Greece, with over 15,000 km of coastline, every square kilometre equates to 114 m of coast or "seafront" compared to an EU average (27 member states) of 6.5m, and a world average of just 4.3 m!

*Asset Portfolio

*spaces necessary to meet basic needs of society.